permeable concrete

February 8th, 2016

permeable concrete

is it the answer to the flooding issues – Topmix Permeable concrete can absorb 880 gallons of water in 60 seconds. Varied reactions to this report online today with some of the feedback below.
“It would be good for some race tracks around the world”

 

“Cold winters! Water will get into the pores and freeze, breaking up the concrete just as it does regular concrete and asphalt roads”
“The top permeable concrete is supposed to be a channel, not a reservoir. All the water will flow through it and get discharged from the embedded pipes or seeps down to the bottom soil layer. So no worries for frost damage”
“They tried it here in Ohio. It failed, filled up the pores with dirt, stones and leaf debris”
“We’ve been using it in California to return sitting water to the water table. it’s probably good for everywhere that there’s not a real winter”
“Permeable concrete will be as useless as permeable block paving. Clogs up over the space of a year then its sealed”
“With all that water inside it, come the first decent frost and it will break up into tiny pieces”
“So the road absorbs all this water. What happens in winter when all this absorbed water freezes, expands and lifts the road surface “
“I know of at least one (and probably hundreds) large carpark here in UK that has permeable asphalt (tarmac). No visible drains or gullies. Even in heavy rain it just goes right through to underground drainage. Works well and was fine all winter”
Quite a mixed reaction to this potential alternative to the usual concrete lots more replies which all give rise to the fact that there are still many questions to be answered with this option.
As with all surfaces, gardens and driveways one shoe does not fit all.  As one comment pointed out with regard to the permeable concrete – the level of the water table can have a bearing.
With so many areas in the uk being hit hard with flooding problems, it makes sense to look at all options, but make sure you consider the pros and cons of all surfaces. If water can permeate then weeds can grow and embed, which in turn can weaken the surfaces and make it susceptible to damage. In addition to this maintenance would be a must to ensure the porosity is not diminished with dirt.
Mansfield, Ravenshead, Ripley, Sheffield, Shirebrook. We have to agree this video seems to give credibility to this option but one question we would ask is is how suitable is it for domestic areas?


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